Sexual Harassment in Schools

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace & Schools is Pervasive, Egregious, and Against the Law — Don’t Suffer in Silence! Take Action!

I have been working with victims of sexual harassment for years to protect their rights and obtain compensation for the wrong they have suffered.  Sexual harassment is illegal and should not be allowed to persist in any workplace or school.  When sexual harassment occurs, many people feel confused and helpless.  They don’t know what to do and feel that they have no choice but to endure the sexual harassment.

Forms of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment can come in many different forms.  Sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual advances, verbal or physical conduct or contact of a sexual nature and/or requests for sexual favors.  Sexual harassment can occur between individuals of the opposite sex or same sex.  This can include such things as:

  • Uninvited, unwelcome and deliberate touching, including hugging, back rubbing or touching of other body parts or leaning over, slapping, cornering or pinching
  • Uninvited pressure for sexual favors or dates
  • Uninvited or unwelcome letters, e-mails, text messages, telephone calls of a sexual nature
  • Uninvited sexually suggestive looks or gestures
  • Uninvited and unwelcome sexual jokes or lewd remarks
  • Attempted or actual rape or sexual assault
  • Talking about one’s own sexual activity in front of others
  • Sending or displaying sexually explicit pictures or drawings

Against the Law

Title VII  of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964  prohibits employment discrimination in the workplace, including discrimination on the basis of sex (including sexual harassment).  Title VII can protect a school district employees from sexual harassment.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 bars sex discrimination from any institution that receives federal funds covering both public and private institutions.  Title IX protects the following individuals from sexual harassment:  students, employees, applicants for admission and employment and other persons at the institutions such as volunteers.  However, a school district cannot be held liable for such harassment unless it has actual notice of the sexual harassment and is deliberately indifferent to such behavior.  Title IX also provides protections for individuals who report violations of the statute.

There are also various state laws that can provide protections to individuals that have suffered sexual harassment.

Tips for Handling Sexual Harassment

If you are being sexually harassed in the workplace or school, you should respond as follows:

  • Tell the offender to stop the behavior and be specific about the behavior and your insistence that it stop.
  • Report the behavior to your employer or school district using the sexual harassment complaint procedure in place.

If you have told the offender to stop and/or you have reported the behavior using the appropriate complaint procedure, and the sexual harassment continues, you should consider contacting an attorney to help you with your problem.  Too often, employers and schools do not appropriately investigate and remedy the situation.

Contact Sexual Harassment Lawyer Cindra Dowd

Sexual harassment can be distressing and interfere with your ability to do your job or attend school.  Sexual harassment law can also be confusing and daunting.  If you need help with this stressful situation, call me, Cindra Dowd at 877-544-5323.  I am here to discuss your situation with you and help you determine your best course of action.

TAKE ACTION TODAY!  STAND UP TO THE OFFENDER AND TELL THEM NO MORE!

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